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Prevalence and risk factors associated with Campylobacter spp. occurrence in healthy dogs visiting four rural community veterinary clinics in South Africa

Karama Musafiri, Cenci-Goga Beniamino T., Prosperi Alice, Etter Eric, El-Ashram Saeed, McCrindle Cheryl, Ombul Jackson N., Kalake Alan. 2019. Prevalence and risk factors associated with Campylobacter spp. occurrence in healthy dogs visiting four rural community veterinary clinics in South Africa. Onderstepoort Journal of Veterinary Research, 86 (1):a1673, 6 p.

Journal article ; Article de recherche ; Article de revue à facteur d'impact Revue en libre accès total
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Quartile : Q3, Sujet : VETERINARY SCIENCES

Abstract : Reports on the occurrence of Campylobacter spp. in dogs in South Africa are non-existent. This study investigated the prevalence of Campylobacter spp. in 481 dogs visiting four rural community veterinary clinics in South Africa. Dogs were screened for Campylobacter spp. by culture and polymerase chain reaction (PCR), and logistic regression analysis was performed to assess the association between sex, clinic, breed and age and the occurrence of Campylobacter spp. in dogs. The prevalence of Campylobacter spp. was 41.50% (95%confidence interval [CI], 37.39% – 46.04%). Campylobacterjejuni, C. upsaliensis and C. coliwere detected in 29.31% (95% CI, 25.42% – 33.54%), 13.10% (95% CI, 10.37% – 16.42%) and 5.41% (95% CI, 3.71% – 7.82%) of dogs, respectively. Dogs carrying more than one species of Campylobacter spp. accounted for 6.23% (95% CI, 4.40% – 8.78%). Campylobacterupsaliensisand C. jejuni were detected in 3.74% (95% CI, 2.37% – 5.86%), whereas C. coli and C. jejuniwere found in 2.49% (95% CI, 1.42% – 4.34%) of dogs. Age and clinic were the risk factors significantly associated with Campylobacter spp. occurrence, while age, breed and clinic were predictors of C. jejuni carriage. Furthermore, age was the only risk factor associated with a higher likelihood of carrying C. upsaliensis. The prevalence of Campylobacter spp. C. jejuni and C. upsaliensis increased significantly as dogs grew older. In addition, the odds of carrying Campylobacter spp. were higher in the Staffordshire bull terrier breed compared to crossbreed dogs. In conclusion, this study shows that dogs visiting rural community veterinary clinics in South Africa are reservoirs of Campylobacter spp. and may be potential sources of Campylobacter spp. for humans living in close proximity of the dog populations under study.

Mots-clés Agrovoc : Chien, Campylobacter

Mots-clés géographiques Agrovoc : Afrique du Sud

Mots-clés libres : Dogs, Campylobacter spp., Campylobacter jejuni, Campylobacter coli, Campylobacter upsaliensis, Risk factors, South Africa

Classification Agris : L73 - Animal diseases
L10 - Animal genetics and breeding

Champ stratégique Cirad : CTS 4 (2019-) - Santé des plantes, des animaux et des écosystèmes

Auteurs et affiliations

  • Karama Musafiri, University of Pretoria (ZAF) - auteur correspondant
  • Cenci-Goga Beniamino T., University of Pretoria (ZAF)
  • Prosperi Alice, University of Perugia (ITA)
  • Etter Eric, CIRAD-BIOS-UMR ASTRE (ZAF)
  • El-Ashram Saeed, Foshan University (CHN)
  • McCrindle Cheryl, University of Pretoria (ZAF)
  • Ombul Jackson N., University of Nairobi (KEN)
  • Kalake Alan, Gauteng Department of Agriculture and Rural Development (ZAF)

Source : Cirad-Agritrop (https://agritrop.cirad.fr/592555/)

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