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Field experiments on irrigation dilemmas

Jansen Marco, Bousquet François, Cardenas Juan Camillo, Castillo Daniel, Worrapimphong Kobchai. 2012. Field experiments on irrigation dilemmas. Agricultural Systems, 109 : pp. 65-75.

Journal article ; Article de revue à facteur d'impact
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Quartile : Q1, Sujet : AGRICULTURE, MULTIDISCIPLINARY

Abstract : It is often assumed that irrigation systems require a central authority to solve coordination problems due to the asymmetry in position and influence between those located at the head-end of a system and those located at the tail-end. However, many examples of complex irrigation systems exist that are selforganized without central coordination. Field experiments on asymmetric commons dilemmas are performed with villagers in rural Colombia and Thailand. Our experiments show that there is a dynamic interaction between equality in the use of the common resource, and the level of the contributions to the creation of a common resource. Inequality in the distribution of benefits in one round triggers lower levels of group contributions, reducing efficiency and triggering even more inequality in contributions and distribution of the resource among players. The upstream players act as ''stationary bandits''. They take more than an equal share of the common resource, but leave sufficient resources for the downstream players to stimulate them to continue their contributions to the public infrastructure. After 10 rounds, players can vote on one of three allocation rules: equal quota, random and rotating access to appropriation of the resource. The rotating access is most often elected. The resource dynamics in the second part of the experiment depend on the rule elected. With the quota rule, the stationary bandit metaphor is less relevant since taking equal shares of the resource is enforced. With the rotation access rule, the players act strategically on the rotating position. They invest more when having the first access to the resource compared to less favorable access. And when they have first access they extract the main part of the common resource. The rotation rule led to a reduction of the performance of the groups. With the random access rule there is no such strategic investment behavior and participants remain investing equal and similar levels as in the first 10 rounds. The experiments show that a necessary condition of irrigation systems to self-organize is the development of norms to allocate fair shares of the water in order to recruit sufficient labor to construct and maintain the physical infrastructure. The different allocation rules do not increase efficiency, but they did increase equality of the earnings. (Résumé d'auteur)

Mots-clés Agrovoc : Gestion des eaux, Communauté rurale, Irrigation, Utilisation de l'eau, Ressource en eau, Réseau d'irrigation

Mots-clés géographiques Agrovoc : Colombie, Thaïlande

Classification Agris : P10 - Water resources and management
F06 - Irrigation

Champ stratégique Cirad : Axe 1 (2005-2013) - Intensification écologique

Auteurs et affiliations

  • Jansen Marco, Arizona State University (USA)
  • Bousquet François, CIRAD-ES-UPR GREEN (FRA) ORCID: 0000-0002-4552-3724
  • Cardenas Juan Camillo, Universidad de los Andes (COL)
  • Castillo Daniel, School of Environmental and Rural Studies (COL)
  • Worrapimphong Kobchai, Chulalongkorn University (THA)

Autres liens de la publication

Source : Cirad - Agritrop (https://agritrop.cirad.fr/563844/)

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