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Root biomass quantification of sugar and multipurpose cane varieties for sustainable production

Chopart Jean-Louis, Sergent Guillaume. 2015. Root biomass quantification of sugar and multipurpose cane varieties for sustainable production. . Durban : s.n., Résumé, 1 p. ISSCT Agricultural Engineering, Agronomy and Extension Workshop, Durban, Afrique du Sud, 24 August 2015/28 August 2015.

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abst poster ISSCTroot biomasschopart JL.pdf

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ID579287p.pdf

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Abstract : Sugarcane root biomass is a major component of carbon partitioning in plants and the carbon balance in cultivated soils. Each year sugarcane roots are decomposed , contributing to the pool of organic matter in the soil. Root biomass is especially important when the whole above - ground biomass is used for energy purposes (combustible, alcohol or other). The amounts of root biomass produced per unit area of cultivated soil are not well - known. The objective of the study was to quantify the biomass (above and below ground) production of some multipurpose cane varieties. Studies were conducted to investigate the agronomic effects of using the whole above - ground biomass of multipurpose sugarcane as an energy feedstock. A local conventional sugarcane variety (R579) and three multipurpose cane varieties (WI79460, WI81456, WI86015) were tested at the same location (South of Guadeloupe, on volcanic soils) and with the same cultural practices (planted cane , 1.6 m row spacing). Dry root biomass per unit volume (DRB) was measured from soil monoliths (3375 cm3 ) sampled at different depths (0-15, 15-30 and 30-45 cm) and different distances from the cane row (0-15, 18-33 and 53-68 cm) to account for gradients in RBD and to estimate below - ground biomass production. Fine (<1 mm) and thick roots (>1 mm) were measured separately because sugarcane specific root length are different (Chopart et al 2010). Thick and fine root turnover in soil may also be different. Conventional and multipurpose sugarcane varieties were mainly different in total shoot biomass. Total DRB values of sugar cane (R579) and multipurpose canes were 262 and 318 g/m² respectively. Vertical and horizontal gradients were high. DRB of thick roots were higher than DRB of fine roots. We compared root and total shoot dry biomass (sugarcane: 5400 g/m², multipurpose cane: 6600 g/m²). DRB of multipurpose sugarcane was lower than top biomass (860g/m²) but higher than dead fallen leaves (80 g/m²). DRB is an important component of the soil carbon balance because it is naturally mixed to the soil and roots and dead fallen leaves may be the only components returning to the soil. Results from this study can be used to calculate organic matter balance of the soil, helping modellers, decision makers and growers to account for root systems for soil organic matter management of sugarcane cropping systems for energy or for animal feed. (Résumé d'auteur)

Classification Agris : F62 - Plant physiology - Growth and development
F30 - Plant genetics and breeding
P01 - Nature conservation and land resources

Auteurs et affiliations

  • Chopart Jean-Louis, CIRAD-PERSYST-UPR AIDA (GLP)
  • Sergent Guillaume, CIRAD-PERSYST-UPR AIDA (GLP)

Source : Cirad-Agritrop (https://agritrop.cirad.fr/579287/)

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